Kaddish: Women’s Voices is a deeply moving anthology of women who have loved and lost and prayed. The essays it contains are short in length but long in wisdom, consolation, and comfort. I have never had to say Kaddish, thank God, but when my turn comes, I will open this book again.”
Erica Brown, author of Happier Endings

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   First there was one women saying Kaddish in shul. Then another and then another. Today, women saying Kaddish is a movement — and a welcome one. The 52 essays in this book give women a voice and a place. Each one is a prize. We are all enriched by this volume.”
Ari L. Goldman, author of Living a Year of Kaddish and The Search for God at Harvard

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   This is a groundbreaking work! Women are newly coming to Kaddish, with a selfconsciousness and introspection that demonstrate the power of ritual to connect us to our innermost self. I got teary-eyed in so many places, but I also laughed out loud in others. This book will surely help make a practice that is just coming into its own become a fixed ritual for all time.”
Blu Greenberg

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   Kaddish: Women’s Voices is a warm, personal invitation into the sisterhood of mourners. Reciting Kaddish has altered the lives of these women, and now the lives of the readers of this collection. Deeply moving and inspiring.”
Aliza Kline, Founding Director of Mayyim Hayyim Community Mikveh

   A tribute to the ability of contemporary women to find meaning in an age-old custom and strengthen it further in our time.”
Hadassah Lieberman

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    Anyone who reads it will come away with a new appreciation of the power of daily prayer to heal bruised hearts and to give new spirit in time of loss . . . What a much-needed book this is!”
Rabbi Jack Riemer

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    This is a most important book. Great halakhic decisors like my revered teacher, Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik zt”l, have ruled that women may recite the Mourners Kaddish from the women’s section of the synagogue – even if a woman is the only one reciting it. This is fundamentally because the obligation to honor one’s parents applies to women just as it does to men and the Kaddish is an expression of honoring one’s parents. Unfortunately some Orthodox synagogues are not so user friendly to women seeking to fulfill their obligation of parental fealty. Hopefully this book will raise the consciousness of many Orthodox congregations to welcome with warmth women who enter their portals for this purpose.”
Rabbi Shlomo Riskin

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    Saying Kaddish is not only a personal act to honor the dead; it is also a communal experience that uplifts the mourner. This moving anthology should inspire other women to take advantage of this enriching halakhic opportunity.”
Dr. Joel B. Wolowelsky, Yeshivah of Flatbush, Author of Women, Jewish Law and Modernity